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Massieu, L; Haces, ML; Montiel, T (2010)

SELECTIVE VULNERABILITY OF BRAIN REGIONS TO OXIDATIVE STRESS IN A NON-COMA MODEL OF INSULIN-INDUCED HYPOGLYCEMIA

NEUROSCIENCE 165(1):28-38
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Insulin-induced hypoglycemia causes the death of neurons in particular brain regions including the cerebral cortex, the striatum and the hippocampus, while the cerebellum and the brain stem are more resistant. The mechanisms underlying this selective vulnerability to hypoglycemic damage are unknown. In the present study we have analyzed the presence of lipoperoxidation products and nitrosilated protein residues in different rat brain regions during and after the induction of hypoglycemia. Insulin-injected hypoglycemic rats were sacrificed before the onset of the isoelectric period or infused with glucose to end hypoglycemia, and then sacrificed at different times. Increased lipoperoxidation levels were observed before the onset of the isoelectric period, while 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) residues in proteins and NT-positive cells were only observed after glucose reperfusion. These changes were found only in vulnerable brain regions, while none of them was evident in the cerebellum, suggesting a correlation between oxidative damage and vulnerability to hypoglycemic neuronal death in selective brain regions. Results suggest that a pro-oxidant state is promoted in certain brain regions during hypoglycemia and after the glucose reperfusion phase, which might result from the activation of several oxidative stress pathways and may be related to subsequent cell death. (C) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.