Luis Lemus

Luis Lemus

Neurociencia Cognitiva

lemus@ifc.unam.mx

Department of Cognitive Neuroscience

Tel. +52 55 56225675

Intereses de Investigación

There are two lines of research in my laboratory:

1) Where and how different neuronal circuits represent acoustic categories in the cerebral cortex.

2) How are the perceptual equivalences between stimuli of different sensory modalities achieved?


Trayectoria profesional

Associate Professor, SNI I

Instituto de Fisiología Celular (desde 2019)

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México


Posdoctorados y estancias

Asif Ghazanfar (2009-2011)

Neuroscience Institute. Departments of Psychology and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Princeton University., Princeton, N.J. Estados Unidos


Formación académica

PhD in Biomedical Sciences, UNAM. (Lab. Ranulfo Romo) (2004-2009)

Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico


Bachelor in Biology (1996-2002)

Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, Mexico


Premios y distinciones

  • PRIDE C UNAM (2014 – Present)
  • SNI I, CONACYT (2012 – Present )
  • PAIPA C UNAM (2012 – 2013 )
  • Maximiliano Ruiz Castañeda Award, AMM (2000 )

Líneas de Investigación

Perceptual equivalence of auditory and visual information : The aim of this project is to understand the way the brain produces perceptual equivalence between information of different sensory modalities. For example, perceiving the barking of a dog as equivalent to the visual image of a dog. To investigate such a problem, we perform neurophysiological recordings of several areas of the brain during perceptual reports of audiovisual equivalence.

Neuronal correlates of acoustic categories in the cerebral cortex : A central problem in neuroscience is to understand the way the brain represents acoustic categories (e.g., monkey vocalizations and human words). We hypothesize that the auditory cortices at the temporal lobe hierarchically create long-term memory circuits of such representations, which later, cortical areas of the frontal lobe may use to organize and produce behavior. To test these hypotheses, we perform neurophysiological studies of brains trained to recognize multiple complex sounds.


Ligas de Interés


Integrantes del laboratorio


Estudiantes