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Bermudez-Rattoni, F; Pedroza-Llinas, R; Ramirez-Lugo, L; Guzman-Ramos, K; Zavala-Vega, S (2009)

SAFE TASTE MEMORY CONSOLIDATION IS DISRUPTED BY A PROTEIN SYNTHESIS INHIBITOR IN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS SHELL

NEUROBIOL LEARN MEM 92(1):45-52
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Consolidation is the process by which a new memory is stabilized over time, and is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. A useful model for studying memory formation is gustatory memory, a type of memory in which a novel taste may become either safe by not being followed by negative consequences (attenuation of neophobia. AN), or aversive by being followed by post-digestive malaise (conditioned taste aversion, CCA). Here we evaluated the effects of the administration of a protein synthesis inhibitor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell for either safe or aversive taste memory trace consolidation. To test the effects on CTA and AN of protein synthesis inhibition, anisomycin (100 mu g/mu l) was bilaterally infused into the NAc shell of Wistar rats' brains. We found that post-trial protein synthesis blockade impaired the long-term safe taste memory. However, protein synthesis inhibition failed to disrupt the long-term memory of CCA. In addition, we infused anisomycin in the NAc shell after the pre-exposure to saccharin in a latent inhibition of aversive taste. We found that the protein synthesis inhibition impaired the consolidation of safe taste memory, allowing the aversive taste memory to form and consolidate. Our results suggest that protein synthesis is required in the NAc shell for consolidation of safe but not aversive taste memories, supporting the notion that consolidation of taste memory is processed in several brain regions in parallel, and implying that inhibitory interactions between both taste memory traces do occur. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.