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Scientific Program

III World Congress of Chronobiology

Puebla, México. May 5-9, 2011

Getting to
Puebla

 


 

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International

John Araujo (Brazil)
Israel Ashkenazi (Israel)
Russell Foster (UK)
Jose Ramón Eguibar (Mexico)
Diego Golombek (Argentina)
Mario Guido (Argentina)
Ken-Ichi Honma (Japan)
Takao Kondo (Japan)
Mirian Marques (Brazil)
Luiz Menna-Barreto (Brazil)
Paul Pevet (France)
Francesco Portaluppi (Italy)
William Schwartz (EUA)
Shigenobu Shibata (Japan)
Rae Silver (EUA)

Local

Mario Caba
Ivette Caldelas
Mauricio Díaz-Muñoz
Porfirio Carrillo
Ma. Luisa Fanjul
Pablo Valdez
Javier Velázquez
Mari Carmen Cortez
Candelaria Ramirez
Arturo Vega-Gonzalez

 

 

Final Program


PDF Files

General Information

Program

Abstracts

For directions and poster preparation guide see General Information

High resolution maps: Hotel Map and Transportation map

 

Organizing Committee

The Congress is organized by the Latin American Group of Chronobiology on behalf of the World Federation of Societies on Chronobiology.

 

Raúl Aguilar-Roblero (México)
President

 





May 6 (Fri)

Main Hall

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 1.
Molecular and Network Properties of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.
Chairpersons: Sato Honma (Japan) and Rae Silver (USA).

S1.1

Cellular rhythms and neural networks in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.
Sato Honma.

S1.2

Phosphatase in suprachiamatic nucleus, PHLPP1/SCOP, controls period change after light-induced phase shift, ‘After-Effect of Phase-Shift’.
Satoru Masubuchi.

S1.3

Explorations of the circuit structure of the SCN.
Rae Silver.

S1.4

Regional period difference that generates a phase gradient in the mammalian circadian center.
Yasufumi Shigeyoshi.

S1.5

From Nodes to Networks in the Mammalian Circadian System.
Erik D. Herzog.

Movie Theater

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 2.
New insights in the circadian mechanisms regulating food anticipation.
Chairperson: Etienne Challet (France).

S2.1

Circadian clocks for all mealtimes: Anticipation of multiple daily meals in rats and mice.
Ralph Mistlberger.

S2.2

It is possible to anticipate to pheromones? A study in newborn rabbits fed by enteral nutrition.
Ivette Caldelas.

S2.3

Relationship between the Food-Entrainable Oscillator (FEO) and Methamphetamine Sensitive Circadian Oscillator (MASCO).
Michael Menaker.

S2.4

Food entrainment of peripheral clocks evaluated by in vivo imaging.
Yu Tahara.

Virtual Room

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 3.
Role of circadian clocks in fitness and adaptation.
Chairperson: Amita Shegal (USA).

S3.1

Circadian clocks support health by orchestrating removal of oxidative damage.
Jaga Giebultowicz.

S3.3

Brood-related plasticity in circadian rhythms of bumble bee queens.
Guy Bloch.

S3.2

The SCN neuronal network and its adaptation to temporal challenges.
Horacio de la Iglesia.

S3.4.

Diurnal activity in a small desert rodent: mechanisms, adaptations and constraints.
Noga Kronfeld-Schor.

10:30 - 11:00

Coffee Break (Terrace).

Main Hall

11:00 - 11:30

Historical Lecture.

Localization of Function: A Brief History of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.
Robert Y. Moore.

11:30 - 12:30

Plenary Lecture.
Intramolecular feedback of KaiC ATPase is the basic pacemaker of circadian clock in cyanobacteria.
Takao Kondo.

12:30 - 15:00

Lunch.

Virtual Room

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 4.
Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the Drosophila circadian system.
Chairpersons: Norio Ishida and Kenji Tomioka (Japan).

S4.1

NEMO kinase contributes to core period determination by slowing the pace of the Drosophila circadian oscillator.
Paul Hardin.

S4.2

Circadian rhythm of Drosophila behavior; different brain-sites required for locomotor and courtship.
Norio Ishida.

S4.3

A possible synaptic transmission involved in the Drosophila circadian clock.
Kenji Tomioka.

S4.4

The consequence of arrhythmicity in the German cockroach.
How-Jing Lee.

Movie Theater

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 5.
Nonphotic Entrainment in Mammals.
Chairperson: Roberto Refinetti (USA).

S5.1

On the Social Regulation of Circadian Timekeeping.
William J. Schwartz.

S5.2

Entrainment by food restriction.
Jorge Mendoza.

S5.3

Entrainment of circadian rhythms by cycles of ambient temperature in mammals.
Roberto Refinetti.

S5.4

BRAIN REWARD: STIMULATION FOR NONPHOTIC PHASE REGULATION OR JUST A GOOD TIME?
J. David Glass.

Main Hall

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 6.
A time to heal: cross-talk between the immune and the circadian systems.
Chairperson: Ruud Buijs (México).

S6.1

Photoperiodic control of innate and adaptive immunity.
Brian Pendergast.

S6.2

Dysregulation of Inflammatory Responses by Chronic Circadian Disruption.
Alec Davidson.

S6.3

Laborious Phase Shifting (LPS): following the pathways of immune-circadian communication.
Diego Golombek.

S6.4

The circadian clock controls the response of T cells to antigen.
Nicolas Cermakian.

S6.5

Time of infection determines the response of the innate and adaptive immune system.
Natali Nadia Guerrero.

17:00 - 19:00

Poster Session






May 7 (Sat)

 

Movie Theater

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 7.
Neuropeptides and Circadian Rhythms.
Chairperson: Hugh Piggins (UK).

S7.1

Role of the neuropeptide VIP in the mammalian circadian system.
Chris Colwell.

S7.2

Neuropeptide modulation of the intracellular calcium concentration of suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.
Charles Allen.

S7.3

Heterogeneous and novel electrophysiological actions of orexin-A on circadian clock neurons in mice.
Mino Belle.

S7.4

Neuropeptides derived from clock-controlled genes as mediating signals for the output of suprachiasmatic clock.
Qun-Yong Zhou.

Virtual Room

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 8.
Entrainment of the Circadian Clocks during Development.
Chairperson: Alena Sumova (Czech Republic).

S8.1

Entrainment of the circadian clocks along ontogenesis.
Alena Sumova.

S8.2

Maternal melatonin, a chronobiotic for fetal circadian clocks.
Maria Seron-Ferre.

S8.3

The developing pacemaker: sensitive but resilient.
Fred Davis.

S8.4

The rabbit pup, a natural model of food entrainment.
Mario Caba.

Main Hall

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 9.
Clock control of glucose metabolism.
Chairperson: Andries Kalsbeek (The Netherlands).

S9.1

Circadian system and its disruption; effects on glucose metabolism in humans.
Frank Scheer.

S9.2

The metabolic clockwork.
Akhilesh Reddy.

S9.3

Circadian clocks in adipose tissue.


Jeffrey Gimble.

S9.4

Hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the SCN control of hepatic glucose production.
Andries Kalsbeek.

10:30 - 11:00

Coffee Break (Terrace).

Main Hall

11:00 - 11:30

Historical Lecture.
History of Chronobiological SocietiesChronobiologists are always looking for the best friend.
Ken-ichi Honma.

11:30 - 12:30

Plenary Lecture.
Physiological and metabolic adaptations associated to daytime food synchronization in rat.
Mauricio Díaz-Muñoz.

12:30 - 15:00

Lunch.

Virtual Room

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 10.
Retina and Peripheral Clocks.
Chairpersons: Mario Eduardo Guido (Argentina) and Ana Maria Castrucci (Brazil).

S10.1

Light responses in peripheral tissues: how do things change following evolution in perpetual darkness?
David Whitmore.

S10.2

Early-stage retinal melatonin synthesis impairment in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats.
Daniella C. Buonfiglio.

S10.3

Circadian Oscillators in Retinal Ganglion Cells. Light and Dopamine Regulation and Intrinsic Photoreceptive Capacity.
Mario Eduardo Guido.

S10.4

Fish, amphibian and avian cells as peripheral clocks: a comparative approach to study melanopsin signaling and regulation of clock genes.
Ana Maria de Lauro Castrucci.

Main Hall

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 11.
Seasonal timing of Reproduction in Vertebrates.
Chairperson: Valerie  Simonneaux (France).

S11.1

Tanycytes and RFamides, the new players in seasonal reproduction.
Paul Klosen.

S11.2

CNS Sites of Melatonin Action for Reproductive and Body Fat Responses in Siberian Hamsters.
Timothy J. Bartness.

S11.3

Acute Induction of Eya3 by late-night light stimulation triggers Tshβ expression in photoperiodism.
Hiroki R. Ueda.

S11.4

Photoperiod and the male effect can be used to control the reproductive activity in subtropical goats.
Jose Alberto Delgadillo.

Movie Theater

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 12.

The pathology of desynchronization.

Chairperson: Roberto Salgado-Delgado (México).

S12.1

Desynchrony as a tool to investigate the role of the human circadian system in physiology and pathophysiology.
Frank Scheer.

S12.2

Desynchronized Circadian Rhythms: Bow to the Master.
Horacio de la Iglesia.

S12.3

Food as chronotherapy to ameliorate the adaptation to a new time zone.
Manuel Angeles-Castellanos.

S12.4

Nightwork leads to obesity and diabetes: a rat model of nightwork uncovers internal desynchrony at the level of the hypothalamus and within the liver.
Roberto Salgado-Delgado.

17:00 - 19:00

Poster Session

Virtual Room

18:00 - 19:00

WFSC Business Meeting





May 8 (Sun)

Movie Theater

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 13.
Physiological correlates and mechanisms of circadian brain oscillators beyond the SCN.
Chairperson: Oscar Castanon (EUA).

S13.1

Daily rhythms in olfactory discrimination depend on clock genes, but not the suprachiasmatic nucleus.
Daniel Granados.

S13.2

The cerebellum; a circadian oscillator synchronized by food.
Jorge Mendoza.

S13.3

Dopaminergic modulation of clock mechanisms.
Suzanne Hood.

S13.4

Putative circadian oscillators in the epithalamus and hypothalamus.
Hugh Piggins.

Main Hall

 

 

 

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 14.
The Importance of Being Entrained.
Chairperson: Martha Merrow (The Netherlands).

S14.1

The consequences of dys-entrainment.
Till Roenneberg.

S14.2

On the evolution of Drosophila blue light photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME and its relation to the visual system.
Gabriella M. Mazzotta.

S14.3

The early worm catches the light (and the heat): circadian entrainment in C. elegans.
Diego Golombek.

S14.4

Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates period length and phase resetting of the mammalian circadian clock.
Urs Albrecht.

Virtual Room

 

 

 

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 15.
The mammalian circadian timing system: Hormonal key mechanisms involved in organization and coordination of central and peripheral clocks.
 
Chairperson: Paul Pévet (France).

S15.1

HSD3B1: a new enzyme linking circadian clock and hypertension.
Hitoshi Okamura.

S15.2

Physiology of the adrenal circadian clock.
Henrik Oster.

S15.3

Glucocorticoid regulation of clock gene expression in the mammalian brain.
Lauren Segall.

S15.4

Melatonin, an endocrine output of the central clock involved in the regulation of human circadian rhythms.
Bruno Claustrat.

10:30 - 11:00

Coffee Break (Terrace).

Main Hall

11:00 - 11:30

Historical Lecture.
Persistent, Endogenous, Innate, Precise: On the early history of some key concepts in circadian rhythms.
Serge Dann.

11:30 - 12:30

Plenary Lecture.
Circadian control of output in Drosophila.
Fernanda Ceriani.

12:30 - 15:00

Lunch.

Main Hall

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 16.
Circadian regulation of behaviors in mammals.
Chairpersons: Ken-ichi Honma (Japan) and Horacio de la Iglesia (USA).

S16.2

The master and slave oscillators for behavioral rhythms in mice.
Yujiro Yamanaka.

S16.3

A functional property of circadian pacemakers which control behavioral rhythms.
Wataru Nakamura.

S16.4

Temporal nice switching in the house mouse: why and how?
Roelof A. Hut.

S16.5

The role of the habenula in the regulation of locomotor activity.
Mathew J. Paul.

Movie Theater

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 17.
Nutrients and palatable snacks the dissection of brain and peripheral oscillators.
Chairperson: Carolina Escobar (México).

S17.1

DMH-SCN interaction permits food anticipatory behavior during the rest phase.
Ruud Buijs.

S17.2

Role of food components in entrainment of mouse liver clock.
Shigenobu Shibata.

S17.3

“Sweet transition” of neuronal activity induced by entrainment on palatable food.
Elena Timofeeva.

S17.4

Gut peptides are not necessary for food anticipatory activity induced by a highly palatable meal.
Megan Dailey.

Virtual Room

15:00 - 17:00

Symposium 18.
Roles for Glial Cells in the Circadian Neural Circuitry.
Chairperson: Rob Jackson (USA).

S18.1

Circadian Rhythms in Glial Calcium Signaling Mediate Rhythmic Extracellular ATP Accumulation in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.
Mark Zoran.

S18.2

Astrocyte-astrocyte communication and connexin 43 regulate mammalian circadian rhythms.
Luiciano Marpegan.

S18.3

Adult glial cells modulate the circadian neuronal circuit.
Rob Jackson.

S18.4

The involvement of glia in the circadian regulation of neuronal morphology.
Elżbieta Pyza.

17:00 - 19:00

Poster Session





May 9 (Mon)

 

Virtual Room

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 19.
Circadian regulation of sensory processing.
Chairperson: Erik Herzog (USA).

S19.1

Circadian regulation of sensory processing.
Erik Herzog.

S19.2

Circadian Regulation of Olfactory Sensitivity and Olfactory Behavior in the Cockroach, Leucophaea maderae.
Terry Page.

S19.3

Circadian rhythm in olfaction in a subterranean organism.
Martha Merrow.

S19.4

Circadian gating of photic inputs in plants.
Andrew Millar.

S19.5

Circadian Modulation of Simple and Selective Attention in Humans.
Ken Wright.

Movie Theater

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 20.
Quantitative analysis of rhythmic data.
Chairperson: Mary Harrington (USA).

S20.1

Tracking phase in a network of heterogeneous SCN cells.
Stephanie Taylor.

S20.2

Applying Wavelet Transforms to Circadian Data.
Tanya Leise.

S20.3

New methods of analysis for Chronobiology: complexity, fractals, dimensions, recurrence plots.
Díez-Noguera.

S20.4

Modeling entrainment of the mammalian circadian clock.
Adrián Granada.

Main Hall

8:30 - 10:30

Symposium 21.
Inter-Individual Variability in Circadian rhythms and Sleep homeostasis.
Chairperson: Antoine Viola (Switzerland).

S21.1

Effects of PERIOD3 polymorphism on circadian rhythmicity and sleep homeostasis in healthy older individuals.
Antoine Viola.

S21.2

Involvement of clock genes in sleep homeostasis in mice.
Valerie Mongrain.

S21.3

Functional genetic polymorphisms of BDNF and ADA modulate sleep and neurobehavioral performance during.
Valérie Bachmann.

S21.4

Interaction of non-circadian effects of light with circadian rhythm and sleep homeostasis.
Patrice Bourgin

10:30 - 11:00

Coffee Break (Terrace).

Main Hall

11:00 - 11:30

Historical Lecture.
Serendipity or "the prepared mind": the true history of some discoveries in the Menaker lab.
Michael Menaker.

11:30 - 12:30

Plenary Lecture.
Sociobiology of human timing.
Till Roenneberg.

20:00 - 23:00

Closing Dinner


 

Abstracts Submission